Coinciding with the 200th anniversary of Giuseppe Verdi’s birthday, CSO Resound releases its second recording with Maestro Riccardo Muti featuring Verdi’s second-to-last opera, ‘Otello’. The recording joins remarkable fidelity to the instrumental and choral score with a spellbinding collection of vocal soloists, and will be treasured by opera lovers and anyone who enjoys thrilling music. Recorded live in concert at Symphony Center in 2011, this album will stand as benchmark in Verdi performance and interpretation by one of today’s finest conductors. Maestro Muti and the CSO’s first recording together was a lauded album of Verdi’s ‘Messa da Requiem’, which won two Grammy® Awards.

Pre-order at a special price as part of the new CSO Resound Label Offer


VERDI Otello. Aleksandrs Antonenko, Krassimira Stoyanova, Carlo Guelfi, Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Riccardo Muti. CSO Resound 2 SACDVERDI Otello. Aleksandrs Antonenko, Krassimira Stoyanova, Carlo Guelfi, Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Riccardo Muti. CSO Resound 2 SACDView or buy

VERDI Otello. Aleksandrs Antonenko, Krassimira Stoyanova, Carlo Guelfi, Barbara Di Castri, Juan Francisco Gatell, Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Riccardo Muti. CSO Resound 2cdsVERDI Otello. Aleksandrs Antonenko, Krassimira Stoyanova, Carlo Guelfi, Barbara Di Castri, Juan Francisco Gatell, Chicago Symphony Orchestra / Riccardo Muti. CSO Resound 2cdsView or buy


A musical force in Chicago and around the world, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra is consistently hailed as one of the finest international orchestras. Its expansive catalogue of more than 900 recordings has earned 62 Grammy® Awards—more than any other orchestra in the world.

“The greatest Verdi conductor of our time was on fire, and so were the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus in this concert performance…[Riccardo Muti’s] conducting conjured storm and calm moonlight and stars. His shaping of the accompaniments to the singers’ phrases was extraordinarily sensitive[.]…Muti made “Otello” sound like the dramatic symphony Verdi never wrote. Muti brought out instrumental details almost every other conductor glosses over or ignores.

Everything that makes this Verdi’s supreme lyric tragedy was there for the ear to marvel at, writ larger than life… At the end of the performance a great shout went up from the capacity audience. Chicago Tribune From the “Chicago Sun-Times”: “From strings playing as one, to cello ensembles, the viola choir, brass attacks (never too loud), bassoon and harp lines becoming individual characters, and Scott Hostetler’s magic English horn (the only solo bow granted by Muti) with Desdemona’s solo scene, the case was made. Home run. Grand slam. Touchdown. Viva Muti.
Viva Verdi.”